Appointment to the Illinois Technology Association’s Internet of Things Council

Today I joined the Illinois Technology Association’s Internet of Things Council. Here’s more about that work:

The mission of the ITA Internet of Things Council is to drive advancement of IoT

Midwest Internet of Things Council

technology, policy and industry, establishing Chicago and the Midwest as an epicenter of IoT

Chicago and the Midwest are in a unique position to be a leader in the Internet of Things evolution. We have a rich history of supporting industries such as manufacturing, software, big data, retail and healthcare, giving the region the experience and knowledge to foster the development of the Internet of Things. The Council is driving by the notion that by collaborating closely together, we have all the pieces are right here for the Midwest to emerge as a national leader in the advancement of the Internet of Things.

Here’s some coverage in Blue Sky: ITA Internet of Things Council aims to make Chicago a connectivity hub. Here’s some images:

blue-sky-internet-of-things

ITA-Internet-of-Things-Council-aims-to-make-Chicago-a-connectivity-hub---Chicago-Tribune

Boards: Joining the Sunlight Foundation Board of Directors

SunlightFoundation-logoToday I joined the board of directors of the Sunlight Foundation, a national, nonpartisan, nonprofit organization that uses the tools of civic tech, open data, policy analysisand journalism to make our government and politics more accountable and transparent to all.

Snip:

Daniel X. O’Neil is an open data and open government advocate and the executive director of Smart Chicago Collaborative, a civic organization devoted to improving lives in Chicago through technology. He’s also the cofounder of EveryBlock.

“We’re pleased to welcome these new members to Sunlight’s board of directors,” said Sunlight Co-Founder and Board Chair Mike Klein. “We have great faith that their contributions will strengthen Sunlight’s reach and connect its work to broader audiences.”

My Work With The Chicago Instructional Technology Foundation

Last Fall I joined the Board of Directors for CITF, the Chicago Instructional Technology Foundation, and now that I’ve had a half-year’s worth of meetings, grant requests, and extracurricular work, I wanted to get some thoughts down here.First off, I really enjoy the rhythm and nature of a Board. I’ve served as the Chairman of the Queen of Angels School Board, and the acts of creating an agenda, communicating with members, and driving to decisions always made sense to me. I like the formality of motions, discussion, and voting– it leads to a refreshing form of accountability and discipline. I also like the labor that comes in-between meetings– the extra work that you do, usually based on your interests or skills.At the CITF, we fund media activities to promote progressive social change. That means I get to review funding applications from educators, filmmakers, and technologists who care about the same things I do, and fashion their work in ways that are meaningful. Powerful stuff.While I’m relatively new to this idea of helping decide which projects to fund, I’m more accustomed to being on the other end of the ask. At Queen of Angels I helped start the Development Committee and worked on the inevitable Annual Ball. I relied on outside funding for all of my book and drama projects in the late 80s and early/ mid 90s, and everyone was paid back.Funds make the world go around, and it’s nice to be a part of the world.

2012 Government Selection Committee for Code for America

I’m helping out the awesome Code for America project as they figure out which cities should be a part of their next program year.

19 governments applied for our 2012 program, and it’s amazing to read about their project ideas, challenges, and passion for changing the way things work. As a growing start-up, we can only work directly with a handful next year, which is why they are selected through a competitive process. To help us evaluate these great proposals, we have put together a committee of government, industry, and thought leaders.

Member: Queen of Angels Catholic Parish Pastoral Council

This month I joined the Queen of Angels Catholic Parish Pastoral Council. Here’s the functions of this group:

  • Advise and work with the Pastor on policy development and vision formation.
  • Advise the Pastor on other concerns he may bring to the Council.
  • Coordinate the activities of the Parish towards its goals through its Clusters.
  • Present Parish goals to the Finance Council for their possible incorporation in the Parish budget. The PPC reviews the proposed budget to see what parish goals or pastoral ministries have or have not been financially sustained. The Council may question and advise on the budget.

Queen of Angels Pastoral Council